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Living the Creative Life

Introduction

What does it take to make a person creative?  Endless experimentation, trying new things, and varying the way one absorbs knowledge.  Aim for the top, and you might not get there, but you will at least get near to the top.  In the words of Carlos Castaneda, choose a path with a heart and follow it.  Early on, I chose the path of truth.  Math and science were logical extensions of that path.  I did not understand some things, but I would note them in my mind and sooner or later an explanation would emerge.  When some would call it black and others call it white, I looked for the underlying truth, the gray area where both were partially true in certain ways, where one fit better in certain circumstances and the other fit better in other circumstances.  Ambiguity was not to be tolerated; exploration would clear up the ambiguity eventually.  How the world worked was an endless process of discovery.  Each of the major areas of life was meant to be mastered eventually, leave no stone unturned.  I had no sense of self worth until I got a 100 in an arithmetic exam in the 3rd grade.  Later I tied for highest in the state on a Mathematics Association of America exam in high school.  So I asked for the toughest four year program at the University of Wisconsin, Electrical Engineering, and made four honor societies graduating from the 3rd ranked such program in the nation.  Following a fiancé to Oregon, I fell out of love for her and into love of that state.  Out of work, I got an MBA at Oregon State University because of low tuition and a required Econometrics course.  After a year in LifeSpring trainings I decided on a career leading to the US presidency.  Five years later, I discovered the bar chart that began Peace Economics.  I wrote Peace Economics in 1986, three years after the bar chart discovery, developing the next theory of macroeconomics in the process, with a .999 correlation of a simple sixty year model of US economics.  So I changed my goals to science and by May 1991 I had published the theory of the global warming and cooling cycle.  The world has still not beaten a path to my door, so now I’ve been marketing ever since.  I earned a doctorate in 2009, and got a Nobel Peace Prize nomination in early 2016, and wrote two Encyclopedia of War entries in October 2016.

Childhood

It began with my mother reading to me at bedtime.  Then it went into Erector Sets, Lincoln Logs, and American Bricks, and of course Building Blocks.  Then my uncle said he might become an engineer.  Then I beat my older brother and cousin at checkers, even though grandpa, a law school valedictorian and politician had taught them the game. Then there was the wonderful Time Life Mathematics book, and World Book Encyclopedias. The four of us kids would play board games together, like Monopoly and Careers.  We would play baseball and football out in the street with neighbor kids, and build fox and goose trails in the snow in winter.  In summer we would explore the local parks and arboretum, and sometimes bike five miles out in the country to catch frogs in the back of the state fish hatchery property.  Toads were found in the arboretum near the Wingra Park lagoon.  Estes rockets would sometimes parachute into the top of a tree.  In kindergarten I loved art, and in the third grade developed a lifelong love of arithmetic and mathematics.

Adolescence

Then my love of games took a leap upward with the discovery of Avalon Hill wargames at age 11.  At first I played my older brother at these games, never letting him win, and then I discovered the opponents wanted ads in the Avalon Hill General and soon played many people older than me, never losing.  For ten years I averaged 15 hours a week in wargames in the high school college age years.  I developed a specialty in World War II history by age 16, stunning my high school American history teacher in the final exam on exactly that topic. Then I won the art, science and mathematics awards in my class of 210 in my college prep Catholic high school.  I developed the philosophy of doing my homework and getting good grades, but stretching my mind with new things outside of the schoolwork in the rest of my life.

Young Adult

I had been mistaken for a priest, a lawyer, and a political science major in my twenties.  A dutiful Catholic, I went to church every Sunday until age 23, and then tried four other religions, Baha’i at age 25, Religious Science founded by Ernest Holmes who wrote the book “The Science of the Mind” about metaphysics in the late twenties, Nichiren Shushu Buddhism, the top religion of Japan, at 32 for two years of morning and evening chanting.  Then at age 36 I settled on Unitarianism.  I studied the “Teachings of Jesus” for four years of Sunday afternoon studies at the Quakers around age 50.  I ended up agreeing with Marcus Borg of the Jesus Seminar scholars that Jesus primarily opposed the domination systems of the rich and the Pharisees.  Elitism alienates those in power from the rest of us in a way that ends up self limiting them.  My twenties were very experimental years of consciousness raising.  Listening Exercises at 21, Social Liturgy Wednesdays at the Newman Center at age 23, Experimental College courses taken or taught at age 25, YMCA Singles Association age 27-29 becoming a certified group leader and elected president, 400 hours of LifeSpring trainings at age 28, and then a leap into politics at age 29 to 43 in Eugene Oregon.

Politics

My politics began with 400 meetings of events in the Community Calendar and Political Calendar at age 29, where I learned a little bit about everything in that world, from the Citizens Party and Libertarians to the Jailers Convention.  I attended all four political weekly discussion groups, Demo Forum, Labor Forum, Rubicon Society, and Republican Roundtable. I got involved in local government, state legislatures, and county, congressional, and state levels of the Democratic Party of Oregon.  I was elected or appointed delegate or chairman or executive committee at many levels of the party, including writing the National Delegate Selection plan for the state and later being elected National Convention Delegate under that plan.  I was on the Electoral College slate in 1984, and invited to the Clinton Inauguration in 1993.

Science

Social scientists and academics are a very skeptical crowd.  Peace Economics was very popular until the end of the Cold War.  Not knowing academics before my dissertation in 2009, I made a lot of mistakes and missed a lot of opportunities to accredit my work.  Doing work an order of magnitude beyond the Economists and Global Warming scientists does not sit well with the powers that be.  My in depth interdisciplinary background in nine fields essential to the development of Peace Economics left me without a peer group primed and ready to understand me.  There was so much the academic community needed to learn to catch up with me, yet I didn’t have time for several dissertations in the arcane details of several fields trapped in silo thinking.  Just as five religions helped me triangulate better to the see the real truths, so did the nine fields of math, wargaming, science, engineering, accounting, business, politics, peace economics, and global warming.  Looking at things from the overall picture is just not the same as looking as things from the bottom up.  Triangulating from a variety of fields is not the same as mastering the arcane details of any one field.  Both economics and climate change theory have huge blind spots.

Summary

Throughout this time I was guided by honesty, dislike of bullies, and the search to understand everything about how the world works.  Building a scientific model of the world was my North Star.  Endless experimentation and experiencing were my methods.  Along the way I learned to identify key facts, to take one good new understanding from every new experience, meeting, or lecture.  This gave me excellent long term memory sometimes at the sacrifice of short term memory.  It also explains how I’m better at math, science, and vocabulary, than at reading comprehension.  Thus I’m good at abstract thinking and especially good at summarizing.

Links to Resume and peer reviewed Technical Peace Economics respectively:

https://www.academia.edu/15878982/RESUME

https://www.academia.edu/23034796/TECHNICAL_Peace_Economics_8p._2014-2016

Professor Robert Reuschlein, Dr. Peace, Real Economy Institute,                         Nominated and vetted for the Nobel Peace Prize 2016 and 2017,                                       Contact bobreuschlein@gmail.com Info www.realeconomy.com

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