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10 Ways Heat Affects People

10 Ways Heat Affects People

#1. High temperatures make us lethargic, sluggish, and nonproductive. One study shows we are 37% less productive at 95 degrees Fahrenheit.
#2. High temperature makes us sweat. One estimate is that 85% of solar radiation at the surface of the earth evaporates water. Water evaporation from sweat lowers the heat effect of the sun on us.
#3. High temperature hurts the American economy. When the 95 year period from 1895 to 1988 is broken down into five year periods, fifteen of the 18 period changes show that the economy gets better with cooling and worse with heating.
#4. High temperature hurts the tropical nations. The global North countries do much better than the global South countries because temperate zone economies outperform tropical economies. In Europe and America, the colder states or countries outperform the warmer ones.
#5. High temperature months underperform in the stock market. One study looked at all stock markets in the world and found that the difference was statistically significant that if you buy on Halloween and sell on May Day you will do much better than the reverse. For America the last twenty years the six cold months had a 6 percent higher return than the six warm months. November to April beats May to October.
#6. Because there is more water to evaporate over oceans than lands, the land heats up three times as fast as ocean. With most of the earth’s land in the Northern Hemisphere, the seasons vary three times as much in the North as in the Southern Hemisphere.
#7. The last three thousand years the Mediterranean area has experienced three major warming periods and two major cooling periods. The first major warming moved the ideal temperature zone and the most prosperous civilizations from South to North. 1200 BC Egypt was the dominant civilization but as it got to hot first Greece and then further North Rome became the dominant civilizations.
#8 When the earth suddenly cooled from the 200 AD peak to the next bottom at 450 AD, Rome stopped expanding about 115 AD and started collapsing in the four hundreds AD. Barbarians comfortable in Northern Asia became too cold and sought warmer climates like the Meditarranean.
#9 The next warming around 1000 AD led to the Vikings of Northern Europe becoming active and farming Greenland and a part of Canada called Vinland by the Vikings. The cooling after that led to the Southern European voyages of discovery by Spain and Portugal as the ideal temperature zone moved South.
#10 The warming of the 1700s led to three decades of great crops in Britain and enough leisure time to think up the industrial revolution. This warming continues today with some boost from the greenhouse effect, but a fifty four year cycle created by the evaporation effect has the ocean holding back the land from further warming since 1998 until about 2025.
For more detailed information about these ten points, try the following four articles on my academic website:

CLIMATE Effects ECONOMY:
https://www.academia.edu/4862993/CLIMATE_Effects_ECONOMY_5_p._1999

EVAPORATION makes the world change
https://www.academia.edu/7710046/EVAPORATION_makes_the_world_change_3_pages_1997

CIVILIZATION Changes with Climate:
https://www.academia.edu/4485586/CIVILIZATION_Changes_with_Climate_4p._RE_1999

TEMPERATURE CYCLE PROOF:
https://www.academia.edu/4090273/TEMPERATURE_CYCLE_PROOF_1910-1973-2025

Dr. Peace, Dr. Bob Reuschlein,
best contact bobreuschlein@gmail.com
to leave message 608-230-6640
for more info http://www.realeconomy.com
(Real Economy 1999 available as $10 ebook)

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